Welcome to the Sagelight Editor Blog

This blog is for things currently happening in Sagelight.  Sagelight Version 4 is now free.

Useful links

Homepage: www.sagelighteditor.com

Blog (same as this one, but nicer): www.sagelighteditor.com/blog

My direct e-mail: rob@sagelighteditor.com

Direct link to version 4 (free) : www.sagelighteditor.com/install_sagelight.exe (28  megs, All Windows versions).

Sagelight Editor Facebook Page An informal place to post your pictures, thoughts, and ask questions.  It was just set up — please “like” it so it can get it’s own username.  note: I will be updating this page in a couple days (11/20/19 or thereabouts)

Youtube Page (with video tutorials — can be accessed on the discussion board, too): http://www.youtube.com/sagelighteditor

Highlight Reduction on Faces (GIF Example)

 

This GIF shows reducing the highlights on faces and portraits.  It’s a very quick example, and I will be following up with a Youtube video exploring it in more detail.

CLAHE Highlight Reduction Function

This is an example of using pure Highlight Reduction functionality in the CLAHE Highlight Reduction function in Sagelight (that is, just using the Highlights Slider with the Blend Curve, with perhaps a little of the Details Slider) 

It works so well for effective-yet-simple highlight reduction, I will probably make it a separate feature.  The CLAHE (an HDR detail function) part of it (the Details Slider) can be used for some nice detail and contrast, but is mostly subdued here.  I will get more into the in the YouTube Video

Specialized Sagelight Curves (that Model the Human Eye)

I’ve talked about these curves before, and they’ve become an amazing part of Sagelight.  In fact, the headline of this paragraph will probably be the title of a video/blog entry in the next month or so, as I’ve been rediscovering these curves in new development.

These curves work well with HDR functions (as well as generally) and are designed to mimic how the eye perceives and reacts to lighting changes.  This is not my research, but research I adapted for Sagelight.  As time went by, I realized how effective these curves are in adjusting lighting dynamically and how well they work together with different versions of themselves and as additives to existing functionality.

I will talk more about these curves as I implement them in other functionality in Version 5.   For now, they are featured in most of the HDR functions in Sagelight, and — as an example — are the sole reason why Retinex works as well as it does in Sagelight (the subject of another video coming up).

Reducing the Highlights in Faces vs. the previous post entitled “CLAHE Recovery Function”

In this case, you can see how well it removes the overbearing highlights on the faces without touching the rest of the image.

I recently made a post entitled, CLAHE Highlight Recovery Function that showed this same function in a more HDR manner, creating nice lighting effects.

This is a great contrast using the same function.

Disclaimer on retouched images used in examples:
The retouching on this image was done to show various aspects and power of Sagelight Image Editor that you may find useful in your own image editing.
I personally like the before & after result. Since image editing and retouching is subjective, you might retouch it in a different manner,  finding a result more reflective of your own personal artistic style.

 

HDR Fill Light Example (Space Needle)

 

This GIF example shows using the HDR Fill light bringing up the shadows a tough area that can visible halos.  When there is a dark area with a lot of lot around it, it is easy for halos to appear.

In this case, the HDR Fill light was able to bring up the shadow without touching the highlights and midtones without creating a halo.

It worked well, so I did it again.  I didn’t really need to do it again, but I wanted to show that it is fine for the image to use the same functions more than once in Sagelight.

Using the Undo Brush

I then use the Undo Brush to remove some of the effect of the second pass of the Undo Brush.

Right before I leave the HDR Fill function (the second time), you can see me move the mouse looking for something — I am looking for the transparency so I can set it at 50%.

To my surprise, it wasn’t there!

Well, I will add that in the next update/bug fix.  It seems like a oversight on my part, but it does show one thing:  you can always use the Undo Brush to remove some of the effect of the previous function, either with a slider to set the percentage, or with brushes on specific parts of the image.

Pro Saturation

I then use the Pro Saturation to bring up the colors.  I really like the orange glow of the sunset, and wanted to add contrast.  I probably should have used the undo brush to limit the blue that appeared in the clouds, but it was just a quick example.

I could have used the saturation in the Quick Edit Mode, but the Pro Saturation features a deeper level of saturation (see the Multiplier Slider when I use it, which adds a very pronounced effect).

 

Disclaimer on retouched images used in examples:
The retouching on this image was done to show various aspects and power of Sagelight Image Editor that you may find useful in your own image editing.
I personally like the before & after result. Since image editing and retouching is subjective, you might retouch it in a different manner,  finding a result more reflective of your own personal artistic style.

 

 

 

Highlights and Details Function (examples)

(fullscreen isn’t working on the blog.  Click on the full link https://youtu.be/zjoiSAnm9fA to see it in fullscren on Youtube)

Another one of Sagelight’s really nice HDR functions that may not be as visible as it should, since it’s not part of the Quick Edit Mode.

The Highlights and Details function brings out the shadow areas in your image without touching the highlights, using HDR technology. It can also bring out many details in your image.

This example shows two images, one that brings out the shadow areas easily, and the other that shows the “Details” part of the function, bringing out some great detail and creating effective lighting.

Sagelight 4 is now free. It’s continued development and updates are 100% based on donations through http://www.sagelighteditor.com/donate.html

CLAHE Highlight Recovery Function (Examples)

(fullscreen isn’t working on the blog.  Click on the full link  https://youtu.be/rd1tjBjlVG4 to see it in fullscren on Youtube)

The CLAHE Highlight Recovery function is a great HDR functin and one of the HDR functions added to Sagelight 4. It’s of many functions I want to highlight with Sagelight 4, now that I am back and can show some of its great functions that may not be as easily seen when its not in the Quick Edit Mode.

This video shows two examples of how the CLAHE Highlight Recovery can really bring out elements in your image!

Sagelight 4 is now free. It’s continued development and updates are 100% based on donations through http://www.sagelighteditor.com/donate.html

Sagelight 5 Preview – Equalizer Function

(fullscreen isn’t working on the blog.  Click on the full link https://youtu.be/CP0gOcBMF9E to see it in fullscren on Youtube)

This video shows the Equalizer Function that is a central part of the Quick Edit Mode in development for Sagelight 5. This function is an HDR function that I took from various parts of Sagelight 4. The Equalizer does some amazing things in various ways to images.

This is Part 1, showing on image, and I will upload parts 2-3 in a few days showing more images.

Sagelight 5 is not yet released, and its development progress and pace is based on donations made through http://www.sagelighteditor.com (and Paypal).

A Couple Quick GIF Examples

I’m trying a new thing with putting out quick examples, in this case in .GIF form on Gfycat.  Rather than the longer videos explaining how functions work at length, I am putting out much shorter examples that spotlight parts of Sagelight based on changing one image. This allows me to show some specific feature of Sagelight and to create shorter exampls that make it easier to see the unique features of many Sagelight functions.

I will be posting these on Youtube, and am creating even shorter and more directed versions through Gfycat.com, which I can post inline here and in other places.

Click on the image to see in 1920×1080 fullscreen.  Don’t forget to press the SD/HD button for high-definition!

Power Curves Example — Birds and a Nest against a Blue Sky

In this example, I am using the Power Curves, which is a very powerful function, and will no doubt be the subject of a few more examples.

In this case, I want to deepen the sky in a way that makes it darker, but not fake looking.  With images like this one, with a bright area with foreground objects, it can be hard to change the background area without generating halos.

The Power Curves allow for masking, so tha I can just select the sky area and change it.  Once the area is selected, most of the video is me using the RGB (i.e. light) curve to adjust the darkness of the background, and the saturation curve (i.e. how much color) to adjust the deepness of the color.

The Power Curves work in many spaces, such as RGB, LAB, LCH, HSL, etc.  In this case, I use a simple RGB set of curves, which also adds the ‘C’ curve, to adjust the saturation with its own curve.

Sagelight Version 5 – A Quick Example of the Contrast Function

Sagelight 5 is currently in development and features a completely revamped Quick Edit Mode.  I will be doing a series of videos to show it as I am building it.  This will help get feedback and pointers from users as I develop it.

In this case, I am showing off the Contrast Curves, which adds some new technology and control to Sagelight.   I will be posting a longer version on YouTube shortly, and will describe it more in that post.

This .GIF version shows how fast it can be done with more control, and then also uses the new Vignette slider in the Quick Edit Mode, as well as the Smart Light Function that has always been a great feature of Sagelight.

 

note: Please let me know what you think of the Gfycat feature.  I am looking at compiling a lot of examples and then having them as a separate feature inside of Sagelight for quick video tips.

 

SAGELIGHT IS BACK — AND ITS FREE

After a long hiatus, Sagelight editor is back.

Version 4 is now free, which is something I’ve wanted to try for a long time — give away Sagelight (or a version of it) and see of the pay-what-you-want/donation model can work enough to support Sagelight.  I’m looking at a donation model for version 4, and it would be great if it works.

I am currently writing Version 5 (which is about 70% completed), which has a lot of new changes, including a newly-revamped UI about which I am excited.

First, I want to get Sagelight back on track. I established the discussion board at www.sagelighteditor.com/discussion that explains a few things, including why the site went down. The short story is that it was due to a long-term terminal illness with my father and some predatory family members that weaved a considerable amount of destruction through the family and all of our personal lives. It is all over now, and this allows me to get back to Sagelight, for which I have developed a lot of new features and code.

On the discussion board, I also discuss version 5, and the new release of Version 4 as a free piece of software. This is the latest version with some bug fixes and some changes. See more on the discussion board.

If you are a previous owner of Sagelight, download this version as an update.  It’s exactly the same except for the bug fixes and a few changes.

I will be filling out this blog in the next few days (after Thursday). In the meantime, please feel free to download Sagelight Editor by going to www.sagelighteditor.com and clicking on “Download”. Please report any bugs!

Rob